General Precession

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General Precession

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The resultant motion of the components causing precession of the equinoxes. The general precession is westward along the ecliptic at the rate of about 50.3 seconds of arc per year. </dd>
The effect of the sun and moon, called lunisolar precession, is to produce a westward motion of the equinoxes along the ecliptic. The effect of other planets, called planetary precession, tends to produce a much smaller motion eastward along the ecliptic. The component of general precession along the celestial equator, called precession in right ascension, is about 46.1 seconds of arc per year; and the component along a celestial meridian, called precession in declination, is about 20.0 seconds of arc per year. See astronomical constants. [[/a>|/a> ]]

References

This article is based on NASA's Dictionary of Technical Terms for Aerospace Use